countertop how to take care of
countertop how to take care of

As a boutique sized interior designer firm located in Bergen County, NJ, we select and oversee the installation of countertops for projects about four times a year. Here are tips on how to maintain Quartz countertops.

For day to day use, clean up fresh spills with any brand dish soap and a soft microfiber or cotton cloth. Use a glass or surface cleaner, along with a nonabrasive sponge, to remove stains.

ROUTINE CLEANING

Though quartz will resist permanent staining when exposed to liquids like wine, vinegar, tea, lemon juice, and soda, or fruits and vegetables, it’s important to wipe up spills immediately—before they have a chance to dry.

For dried spills or heavy stains, your best bet is a glass or surface cleaner, a nonabrasive sponge (sponges designed for nonstick pans), and a little elbow grease. Keep a plastic putty knife handy to gently scrape off gum, food, nail polish, paint, or other messes that harden as they dry. Should you find yourself confronting a particularly sticky situation, your stain-busting might require a couple of extra tools.

Removing cooking grease

For left over messes, use a degreasing product, such as Easy-Off. Kitchen degreasers loosen and remove the grease from the quartz countertop surface.

Removing permanent markers

Should you find an ink or permanent marker stain, moisten a cloth with Goo Gone or a comparable product, and rub it into the stain. Rinse thoroughly with warm water to remove any cleanser residue.

DEEP CLEANING

Daily wiping and attention to spills and messes will satisfy your countertop’s basic daily maintenance requirements. But experts also recommend an overall deeper general cleaning at regular intervals. For best results, spray a generous amount of a nonabrasive surface cleaner over your countertop and let it sit for 10 minutes. Wipe away with a non-scratch sponge.

WHAT NOT TO DO

  1. Abrasives and Acid or Alkaline Cleaners. For starters, never use abrasive cleansers and avoid scouring pads (like Brillo pads), which can dull the surface. Soapy water will usually do the trick. If you need a gentle cleanser with a little more oomph to remove surface stains, make sure it is specifically designed for use on quartz. Beware, too, of harsh cleaning solutions at both ends of the pH spectrum. Culprits include products from nail polish remover and turpentine to drain cleaner and dishwasher rinsing agents. Whether highly acidic or highly alkaline, those chemicals can disintegrate the bonds between quartz and resin. Quartz will tolerate casual exposure to milder alkaline solutions, such as diluted bleach, but high-pH substances, such as oven cleaners and concentrated bleach, will damage the surface. If any of the substances mentioned above come into contact with your quartz countertop, rinse the exposed surface immediately and thoroughly with water.
  2. Extreme Heat. Trivets and hot pads are your quartz countertop’s best friends. Though the material is heat- and scorch-resistant, the resin used in manufacturing quartz countertops is a plastic and therefore prone to melting in heat above 300 degrees Fahrenheit. A sudden change in temperature or prolonged exposure to heat from a pan left on the countertop may even cause the quartz to crack. To be safe, always use a trivet or hot pad.
  3. Slicing or Dicing Without a Cutting Board Quartz is a hard surface, but not hard enough to withstand the effects of sharp objects like knives. Make sure to do it on a cutting board to avoid ugly scratches on your quartz countertops.
  4. The Elements Quartz is not the right choice for an open outdoor kitchen in direct sunlight. If you install it outdoors, you do so at your own risk, as all manufacturer warranties cover indoor use only. Day after day in direct sunlight will fade colors and lead to warping or splitting.

No Sealing required!

Unlike natural quartzite, which must be sealed on a regular basis (twice a year according to some experts) Quartz does not require any sealing. Because engineered quartz is factory-produced by combining quart with resins, and binding agents, it is nonporous, therefore making the material impervious to mold, mildew, and stain- and odor-causing bacteria.

( a portion of these instructions were borrowed from Bob Villa.com)

Metal or porcelain lighting should be cleaned with a soft, dry cloth or duster.   Never spray fixtures with a cleaning solution or polish.   If it is necessary to use a cleaning agent, please apply only a mild detergent to a soft, damp cloth for gentle cleansing.  DO NOT use scouring agents, abrasive sponges, hydrochloric acid, vinegar, ammonia, petroleum distillate or metal silicates. Shades should be dusted on a regular basis with a soft cloth.

For Stubborn Spots and Stains: Vacuum to remove loose soil. Use a mild solution of soap and water. Apply the solution to a clean wet sponge and wash, then rinse well. Let air dry naturally. Always try the cleaning method in a hidden area first to be sure of the results. Clean the entire area where the spill occurred.

For Butter, Oil or Grease: Wipe excess oil off the leather with a clean, dry cloth, and then leave it alone as the spot should dissipate into the leather in a short period of time. Do not apply water to clean these spots. Do not use: Hair dryers, any Saddle soaps, oils, abrasives, cleaners, furniture polish, varnish or ammonia water. The leather has already been permanently preserved in the tanning process and needs no maintenance other than the simple cleaning recommended.

We recommend the Moore and Giles leather cleaning care kit: https://www.mooreandgiles.com/care/

A custom rug in a Tenafly New Jersey project.

Needless to say: vacuum regularly every 1-2 weeks.
What to do about a spill: If it’s dry wine use WD40 followed by 91% alcohol. (isopropal alcohol – available from CVS to remove any WD40 residue). If it’s still wet use soap and warm water followed by clear water. ALWAYS BLOT AND DO NOT SCRUB. Call us to clean if all else fails.
Another tip: Try club soda and blot – do not rub. Always use a clean rag. Never soak carpets with anything but water. Cleaning handmade carpets should be performed with the least amount of stress on the carpet fibers. No vacuum with strong suction should be used. No beater brush or other aggressive vacuum attachments should be used on handmade carpets.

FID offers a product called FiberShield protection: “An advanced stain repellent, fabric protectant and fabric flame retardant, FiberShield is is scientifically engineered for use on all types of area rugs, carpeting, upholstery, window treatments, wall fabrics, textiles and much more. FiberShield resists everyday soils, stains and wear, especially those in high traffic areas. FiberShield’s advanced technology helps to retain the color and texture of your fabrics without any change to the fabric, the look, the feel or color for years to come.

FiberShield enables future cleanings to be more effective as the textile is much more protected. Treated fibers and fabrics will demonstrate improved abrasion resistance (wear). Textiles will garner that deep-down protection on each and every fiber with NO COLOR CHANGE. Fiber-Shield will not wear off, therefore your fabric and textiles will be well protected against spills and stains. The patented state-of-the-art polymers in Fiber-Shield will actively fight oil-based stains to further the longevity and beauty of your investment.

Fiber Shield repels oil, water, virtually all food stains,  alcoholic beverages and dirt Fiber Shield is safe with it’s non-toxic, NON-FLAMMABLE, and hypoallergenic properties making it safe for use virtually anywhere in your home. Unlike fabric protection products of the past, FiberShield contains no chemical agents (ex. Teflon or Silicone) that will stiffen the textile or cause yellowing of the fabric. FiberShield is recommended by industry professionals today for new home furnishings, new carpeting, as well as recently cleaned items. This ensures full protection is achieved at the onset.”

Solid linen window treatment with a John Robshaw 6″ band

We advise vacuuming every few months with a brush attachment. Dry clean as needed. (which really shouldn’t be that often).

Fiori Interior Design offers a white glove service in which we will arrange to have someone come to your home, take down the treatments, and then reinstall the treatments once they are dry-cleaned.
For 100% linen fabrics, spot clean only with a water free dry cleaning solvent. Do not saturate or use water. When cleaning a spill, blot immediately to remove spilled material. We recommended using a professional dry cleaning service.


Window Hardware:  Maintain the fine finish by simply dusting with a soft clean cloth.
And keep those kids with stick fingers away from the drapes. (ha)

Wood pieces like dining tables, chairs and end tables need to maintain their fine finish by simply dusting with a soft clean cloth, always rubbing with the grain.

If you use your dining table frequently, every six months, polish with a high quality furniture polish. Apply the polish in a thin, even coat with a dry cloth, rubbing with the wood grain. Buff with a fresh dry cloth while polish is still moist for a rich lustrous finish.
For dining tables, the best treatment while not in use is prevention – ask us who we recommend for custom table pads!

Always protect wood surfaces with felt protectors on lamp bases. Avoid putting plastic, hot dishes directly on the wood. These items will harm the finish. Use coasters for alcohol and water glasses. Address spills and smudges immediately.


Maintain hardware with regular dusting. Clean with mild soap and water and dry thoroughly to avoid water market.

NEVER place anything hot or wet onto a wooden surface as it can cause discoloration, Keep wooden furniture away from air vents, humidifiers and fireplaces, as well as direct sunlight. All can have drying and/or bleaching effects.